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News — Experiment

Papermaking Round 9

Posted by Fallon Foster on

Now I'm getting somewhere.  I went back to using the dispersion method with the deckle.  The pour method is easier, cleaner, and uses 1/4 of the water, but I can reduce the water requirements (which was all of a gallon for this batch) by making a lot of paper in each batch.  I was surprised with how many sheets I got out of the same amount of pulp and, as one might figure, the sheets are smoother and more consistent now.  They're also more flexible so they can fold without cracking now. Now that I have a process I can...

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Papermaking Round 7 & Round 8

Posted by Fallon Foster on

It seems when paper's made on an industrial scale they use hydraulic presses to compress the pulp sheets, both to remove much of the water and to burnish the sheets.  I figured I could probably jury rig a home version using vises and a couple cookie sheets and setting it on one corner.  In hind sight I'm more surprised that it worked at all, but there was a trickle of water that came out over an hour's time or so.  The resulting paper was flatter on one side, if it happened to be flush against the metal (the felt doesn't...

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Papermaking Round 6

Posted by Fallon Foster on

This was a quick round last night, but informative none the less.  I wanted to test if I could use a piece of acrylic to press the paper flat but wound up learning a fair bit more than that.  I cut a peice of acrylic to fit within the deckle and quickly learned that the answer to that first question is "Not really."  With enough pressure the acrylic (or any other flat surface) will depress the pulp, but not enough to give it an even texture and consistency.  This will, however, push most of the air out between the acrylic...

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Paper Making Round 5

Posted by Fallon Foster on

This is one of those cases where a little modern technology makes a dramatic difference.  One cheap blender later the paper's coming out much more uniform.  It's coming along much faster now too, so fast that I tried two types of pulp this week.  The lower batch of pages was made with printer paper and the upper batch was made with junkmail.  I'm probably more amused than I should be that the junkmail is essentially cardboard.  I'm imagining it'll be handy as book binding and structural stuff and I'm fairly happy with it as is.  The recycled printer paper could...

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Manual Paper Making Round 4

Posted by Fallon Foster on

This week I played with going back to printer paper and using saline rather than water.  This was another improvement, but I figure that's more from using printer paper than adding salt to the water.  Near as I could tell, the saline didn't really make any difference.  I gave the pulp two rounds through the mortar and pestle and doubled it up in the mold and that's helped improve the quality of the result, but still not quite where I want to be.  If it sounds like I'm piling too many variables into one experiment, I probably am but it's...

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